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Painted Lady’s

By definition from Wikipedia

Carpenter Gothic, also sometimes called Carpenter’s Gothic, and Rural Gothic, is a North American architectural style-designation for an application of Gothic Revival architectural detailing and picturesque massing applied to wooden structures built by house-carpenters. The abundance of North American timber and the carpenter-built vernacular architectures based upon it made a picturesque improvisation upon Gothic a natural evolution. Carpenter Gothic improvises upon features that were carved in stone in authentic Gothic architecture, whether original or in more scholarly revival styles; however, in the absence of the restraining influence of genuine Gothic structures, the style was freed to improvise and emphasize charm and quaintness rather than fidelity to received models.

We did mention that possibility in the previous post that we would be designing and building carpenter’s gothic homes, and Tiny Green Cabins has built 2 carpenter gothic  that we also call “painted lady’s”

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The history of the Carpenter Gothic style started in the early 1800′s via tents, and most notably the Methodists camp-meeting grounds. The largest of these camp meeting grounds was at Martha’s Vineyards off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. These tents evolved into canvas topped, wood framed, wood sided, and candle lit structures that glowed in the night. They are an interesting link to Carpenter Gothic designs and homes of the later 1800′s.

As time progressed, people dressed up the front of the canvas roofs by designing unique cutouts in the front flaps and adding carvings to the front to stand out from each other. The sides and rear remained simple and plain. So, in a nutshell, Carpenter Gothic homes have carved and unique decorative moldings/features on the front and few, if any, on the sides and rear.

This style works well on a Tiny Green Cabin as one could design their cabin with their own unique personal style and ideas without breaking the bank. Just think of the possibilities that your mind could play with. Are you a hermit – then play around with the door and other features, a person that loves moose – then create a moose motif, so many possibilities…..

Call Tiny Green Cabins TODAY to start your personal design of your own tiny house!

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What makes a healthy home

What Makes A Home Healthy

Home should be a place where you recharge and nurture your health.  In today’s blog post, we’ll look at a few ways you can make your home the healthiest place it can be.

Get Plants

The energy efficiency of modern homes may be great for the planet and your budget, but one unintended side effect of insulation is lack of air flow that may contribute to health problems like asthma.  Not to worry, this problem can be offset by plants.  Plants not only create a welcoming and beautiful visual environment, they also clean the air.  NASA recommends 8-10 potted plants for every 100 square feet.  Plants also have a mental health benefit—they are proven to help with relaxation and productivity.

Consider Pets

Studies have shown repeatedly that furry friends are great for mental health.  If you’re considering adding a dog or cat to your home, it’s worth considering the positive impact doing so could have on your psychology.  A recent study published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” examined just how beneficial pets can be.  Lead researcher Allen R. McConnell, PhD, of Miami University in Ohio noted. “Specifically, pet owners had greater self-esteem, were more physically fit, tended to be less lonely, were more conscientious, were more extraverted, tended to be less fearful and tended to be less preoccupied than non-owners.”

Get Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon monoxide is a highly poisonous gas that can be deadly if inhaled in substantial amounts.  Potential sources of carbon monoxide leaks may be all over your home, including kerosene and gas space heaters, gas water heaters, wood stoves, fireplaces, automobile exhaust, and tobacco smoke.  To prevent illness or even death, carbon monoxide detectors should be placed near all bedrooms and checked regularly to make sure they’re in good working order.  You’ll also want to make sure your appliances and heating system are serviced regularly to make sure they’re in good working order.

Test Your Home for Lead

If you live in a house that was built before 1978, there’s a good chance your paint contains lead.  Lead paint can lead to serious health problems especially for children and pregnant women.  Although new lead paint was outlawed in 1978, it’s still present in millions of older homes, often under layers of newer paint.  Deteriorating lead paint is a medical hazard and needs immediate attention.  Don’t try to remove lead based paint yourself—hire an EPA approved professional.

Manage Mold

Mold can trigger respiratory problems and should be regularly removed.  Any damp area with poor ventilation in your home likely contains mold, and should be cleaned regularly.  A non-ammonia cleaner or dishwashing soap can usually take care of the problem, but for a larger mold issue, you may need to hire a professional. When cleaning mold, you’ll want to wear gloves, a respirator, eye protectants, and clothes that cover your whole body. Mold and spores can be dangerous for your health, so you need to take the appropriate precautions before exposure.

Article contributed by Healthline.com

Ravenlore 2017

A larger Ravenlore Tiny House

Under construction

Specifications;

  • 8′ x 24′
  • 2 lofts
  • storage stairs
  • birch handrail
  • custom color; green, purple, pink, blue
  • Castletop metal shingles
  • Gothic details
  • Gothic window with butterfly grids
  • Reclaimed front door with insulated glass
  • Reclaimed barnwood siding/paneling interior
  • Corrugated Wainscot
  • Reclaimed copper wash basin
  • Hammered Copper sink
  • Copper counter tops
  • Insulated Tempered Windows
  • Hardwood Floors

 

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FYI, Tiny house news

FYI,

Tiny House, trailer

Tiny House Trailer

We have 1 opening for building a tiny house through the rest of the year. Minnesota state rules are that we can only license up to 5 trailers a year without a dealers license and that the trailer title has to be in the companies name and sales tax paid on that purchase.  Since we have already licensed 3 this year, can only do one more.

To get the dealer license for trailers we have to have a display area that can display 7 trailers.
If you want to build a tiny house this year with Tiny Green Cabins you will need to contact us soon.

This does not affect Airstreams or trailers provided by the customer for us to build on.

We will also not buy and sell just trailers until further notice.
Thanks
Jim

Are we RVIA Certified? A customers question

questionA tiny house question often asked;

Are you RVIA Certified?

No, we are not RVIA Certified. We tried about 5 years ago and were told that we would have to conform to all specification of materials which would have meant eliminating our welded steel frames and nontoxic units we build. Unless of course we would pay for research and studies that proved our concepts were acceptable to all the members, manufactures, and board of directors involved in RVIA. We would need to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars to do the studies required. We are a small tiny house builder and do not have those kind of funds available to take that on.

Plus, we would have to build them for seasonal use only as people cannot live in a RVIA certified unit year around or full time! And that will never change.

Since one of the selling points of tiny houses and our units are they are built for full time living, and as time progresses, more and more areas are allowing tiny houses for as a legal full time residence. Even building codes are changing to allow this.

So, we chose to build to our customers specifications and needs rather than to an industry standard that forces all members to adhere to their rules and regulations. We feel we can and do deliver a far superior product than the RVIA Certification would allow.

 

Hope this helps

Jim

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The “Sneaky Pete” Airstream

Or otherwise known as the “shiny tiny” part 2

A new trend is emerging among interior design minded road fanatics. The Airstream trailer is a very popular design. And everyone recognizes them!

Based on a 1954 Airstream Flying Cloud Trailer that once served as a hunting and fishing lodge in Oregon, this completely restored and reimagined trailer (Orvis Timeless Airstream) features a hand-polished exterior, a lush interior that makes liberal use of wood, copper, and leather, all-new running gear to ensure a safe ride, and all the creature comforts you’d expect from a modern tow-behind in a classic package. (Source: uncrate.com)

Based on a 1954 Airstream Flying Cloud Trailer that once served as a hunting and fishing lodge in Oregon, this completely restored and reimagined trailer (Orvis Timeless Airstream) features a hand-polished exterior, a lush interior that makes liberal use of wood, copper, and leather, all-new running gear to ensure a safe ride, and all the creature comforts you’d expect from a modern tow-behind in a classic package. (Source: uncrate.com)

Inspired by innovative airplane designs, the first Airstream trailer was introduced back in 1931. They were built out of aluminum and intended for only the mightiest

of road warriors. Their aerodynamic, rounded metallic designs gave them their badass futuristic demeanor. They’ve since diminished in popularity, but a creative Airstream uprising is just on the horizon.

Lately we’ve been seeing more and more people converting these old-fashioned, outdated contraptions into lavish, comfortable collage1-161road wagons complete with beds, kitchens and even bathrooms. In fact, they’re becoming so popular that even Hollywood star Matthew McConaughey has his very own Airstream trailer that he invested over 200k in.

Here are the benefits of owning an Airstream trailer:

  1. They’re handcrafted in America and built to last a lifetime.
  2. They handle well on the road
  3. They make a great instant hotel room
  4. They are easily recognized as an RV and accepted in RV Parks and campgounds
  5. They can be used for guests at home
  6. They are customizable to ones needs
  7. Their retro look and sleek, aerodynamic design makes for good gas mileage
  8. They put you in an elite community of dedicated Airstream owners

 

We are moving several windows and instead of doing a patch at the old location, we chose to cut out a large section of alumimum.

We are moving several windows and instead of doing a patch at the old location, we chose to cut out a large section of aluminum sheathing to blend the old with the new.

A little catch-up.

The new trailer was built to be the same as the old trailer with few modifications. One being we used a heavier gauge steel to minimize bounce in the frame. We salvaged old parts such as the axles, custom rigging for the axles that allowed for drop pans for the water and waste tank, and the trailer tongue/hitch steel.

Jim is routing out the edge of the plywood as the wall frame require 5/8" sheathing and the Purebond hardwood plywood is only available in 3/4"

Jim is routing out the edge of the plywood as the wall frame require 5/8″ sheathing and the Purebond hardwood plywood is only available in 3/4″

After it was all welded back together, the frame went to the paint booth and painted with a Low VOC primer and paint before it was moved into place to be pushed under the shell. We also ripped Purebond hardwood plywood for the perimeter, front bow, and rear bow. We attached the bow plywood to the shell for rigidity. Since the original floor was 5/8 plywood and we were using ¾”, we had to plane down the edges to fit into the wall channels of the frame.

We used 2 forklifts to lift the shell while we pushed the frame under the shell.

Airstream Lift

Airstream Lift

After lowering it, we pulled the temporary steel supports and bolted the shell to the frame. We then installed the perimeter plywood and screwed that to the trailer frame.

The next step was insulating the floor perimeter with John Mansville foam board followed by installation of the rounded skirt aluminum. The drop pan housing followed shortly after with insulating the water and grey tank before lowering them into place.

In floor Heat

In floor Heat

 

Since we are doing a heated floor system, we installed a false floor for laying the mats and heat cables on. The heat tapes are under the floor so we used the reflective foil to bounce the heat to the flooring of the Airstream . One of the requirements was not to install the heat tape under cabinets and another was do not cut, knick, or damage the heat wires. Once they were installed, we poured a light weigh concrete over the wires and temporarily installed the plywood flooring, followed by building the toe kicks boxes of the cabinets.

 

We now have a list of what will be going into this airstream, that I am calling

“The Sneaky Pete”

  • New Trailer
  • Custom layout
  • Relocate 3 windows
  • Relocate door
  • Add window to bath
  • Add 2 skylights
  • Move rear bath to center of Airstream
  • Natures Head composting toilet
  • Move water tank and grey water tank top between axles
  • DC Lighting
  • AC Appliances
  • Electric in-floor heat
  • Insulate airstream with Johns Manville Foam board
  • Subflooring to be Purebond Hardwood plywood
  • Character grade hickory paneling
  • Maple cabinets
  • Quartz countertops
  • Antique copper end caps
  • Ceramic floor and ceramic bath
  • Custom lift bed frame/mattress
  • Built in benches
  • New stove and microwave
  • LG Washer Dryer Combo
  • Electric fireplace
  • Flat screen TV
  • LED Lighting
  • Panasonic Whisper Quiet Air Exchanger
  • Dakien Heat Exchanger
  • New canvas at awnings
  • Polished Exterior
  • New Underbelly and side pan wraps

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The Shiny Tiny; Airstream Update

The Shiny Tiny, part 1

In October, 2016, we received a phone call asking questions about building a tiny house that resembled an RV as they did a lot of relocating for their work and wanted to be able to stay at RV parks. However, they were experiencing a lot of pushback from RV parks about tiny houses, with one park owner saying “if it looked like an RV, say an Airstream, there would be no questions or issues.”

They then asked if we could renovate an Airstream to a nontoxic unit. They admitted that they called numerous places and no one could or would take on the project. They then asked, if I would consider doing it for them. I cautioned them that it would be out of our norm, but since we knew about nontoxic and chemical free tiny houses, we would do it. We set the budget and started looking for an older Airstream that could be gutted and rebuilt.

Criteria;

  • Price had to be under S15,000
  • No major denting of the roof
  • Few major leaks, All airstreams leak.
  • Within 500 miles of the shop
  • Not a “shiny turd”
  • No tail separation

A “shiny turd” is an Airstream that has been polished but not updated in any other way. It is shined up to get a higher sell price from unsuspecting buyers.

Shiny Turd

Shiny Turd

Another key difference is that a restored, renovated, or modernized Airstream will have documentation to prove that trailer has been repaired, a new axle installed, or the flooring replaced. A “shiny turd” will have none of that. A shiny turd is like a sign that says “buyer beware.”

Tail separation is when the tail end of trailer frame has separated from the main trailer, usually in connections to the trailer frame at the axles. A simple way to check this is to stand on the bumper and move up and down while noticing if the body of the trailer also moves or just the frame does. It is costly to fix and at this point, we were not considering rebuilding the trailer.

What we found was a 31ft 1983 Excella Airstream in fair condition. There was dent in the roof, the top was balding, it smelled slightly musty, and some of the appliances did not work. Since we would be gutting it down to the shell and tossing everything, the trailer appeared doable for the project, so we made a deal.

1983 Excella

1983 Excella

We towed it to the shop and started gutting it to the shell, and found that the floor had rot, which since all Airstreams leak, it was not a surprise. What we encountered next did surprise us. We removed the flooring and found the musty smell was strong. The pink fiberglass insulation in the floor had absorbed moisture with mouse droppings scattered on the top. Mice!!!IMG_20161117_103714750

Upon removal, we found that the underbelly had holes that allowed mice to get inside as well as many mouse carcasses. Upon closer examination, we decided to do a separation of the shell from the trailer so we could work on both. Once we had separation, we could see the holes in the frame from rust and corrosion as well as broken welds in outriggers. The trailer needed some major work.

After consulting with the buyers, it was determined to rebuild the trailer with heavier steel while reusing the axles, step assembly, tongue and hitch, as well as tank enclosures.  The rebuilt trailer cost $800 more than trying to fix the old frame.

The trailer was built for the Airstream in the background making sure we followed the old trailer design so that the shell could be reattached. This Airstream is being modernized to a nontoxic chemical free status. The couple chose the Airstream model over a tiny house as it would be accepted in RV parks for long stays without question.

Some have said that there is not much left of the original and while that is true, the most important parts are left; the RV certification and the shell which says I am an RV, and an Airstream! And it will provide a “safe” home for the owners to live in year around.

The new trailer

The new trailer

It has been said that you have not renovated an Airstream until you stood on the ground while inside the Airstream.

Stood on the ground

Stood on the ground

Airstream has a lot of different meaning for its’ parts such as “banana peels”

The floorplan;

Airstream Retorfit 5_2

If you want to follow the place we post pictures of the build click on the link Airstream Build

Come back for the next update to learn about that and more.

 

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Emily Tiny House

Emily Tiny House

  • 8′ x 20′
  • 48″ tall loft
  • Sleeps 1-2
  • GVW 15,000lbs
  • Sitting/Reading nook
  • Storage Stairs with standup desk
  • Pulley system for raising and lowering workout bike desk
  • Natures Head composting toilet
  • 30″ x 48″ shower with metal walls
Emily Tiny House Elevation 4

Emily Tiny House Elevation 4

Emily Tiny House Elevation 1

Emily Tiny House Elevation 1

Emily Tiny House Elevation 2

Emily Tiny House Elevation 2

Emily Tiny House Elevation 3

Emily Tiny House Elevation 3

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