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Ravenlore 2017

A larger Ravenlore Tiny House

Under construction

Specifications;

  • 8′ x 24′
  • 2 lofts
  • storage stairs
  • birch handrail
  • custom color; green, purple, pink, blue
  • Castletop metal shingles
  • Gothic details
  • Gothic window with butterfly grids
  • Reclaimed front door with insulated glass
  • Reclaimed barnwood siding/paneling interior
  • Corrugated Wainscot
  • Reclaimed copper wash basin
  • Hammered Copper sink
  • Copper counter tops
  • Insulated Tempered Windows
  • Hardwood Floors

 

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FYI, Tiny house news

FYI,

Tiny House, trailer

Tiny House Trailer

We have 1 opening for building a tiny house through the rest of the year. Minnesota state rules are that we can only license up to 5 trailers a year without a dealers license and that the trailer title has to be in the companies name and sales tax paid on that purchase.  Since we have already licensed 3 this year, can only do one more.

To get the dealer license for trailers we have to have a display area that can display 7 trailers.
If you want to build a tiny house this year with Tiny Green Cabins you will need to contact us soon.

This does not affect Airstreams or trailers provided by the customer for us to build on.

We will also not buy and sell just trailers until further notice.
Thanks
Jim

Update on the Ravenlore Tiny House

or a tiny house can appreciate in value

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Some tiny houses do appreciate in value, and the Ravenlore did. Nicki changed her career path which required a relocation to California and flying as a stewardess for Virgin Airlines. With that, she had to make a hard decision about her tiny house. Rather than take it with her, she decided to sell it as she would seldom be home, but traveling the globe.  So she put it up for sale and the Ravenlore sold quickly………..for more money that she paid for it. Like several thousands of dollars more.

We send Nicki best wishes for her new adventures. And if you are thinking of buying a Ravenlore tiny house, we can create one just for you. We do have a Ravenlore starting the “que” in production within 30 days for a customer that decided to purchase one before the price increased.

 

A tiny house named “Spirit”

Tiny House at Lochness Park for a photo shoot

Spirit has 238 sqft on the main level with 138 sqft in the 2 lofts. There is lots of storage in the smugglers holds, sliding spice rack, 7 -toe kick drawers, cabinet bridge, and stairs with built in storage.  Speaking of the cabinet bridge, it is constructed so that a guest could sleep on them, if needed. This tiny house also has a Airport Ball air exchanger to exhaust the stale house air and moisture to the outside while bringing in fresh air.

Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins

Tiny House transport rounding a corner on the way to the photo shoot

Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins, hOMe design

Parking the tiny house

Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins, hOMe design

Tiny House photo shoot at the park

Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins

Tiny house in the park

Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins

Tiny house in the trees

 

Tiny house view thru the windows from the entry

Tiny house view thru the windows from the entry

Tiny house Airondack Recliner

A view of the tiny house Adirondack recliners built above the water storage tanks

 

Tiny House Cabinets

Cabinet bridge with cat sleeping areas, and a view of the Adirondack recliners built above the water storage tanks

Childs Loft

Loft for Wyatt

Tiny House Master Loft

Tiny House Master Loft

Fully functional tiny house kitchen

ully functional tiny house kitchen, with space saving dishwasher, range with oven, 7.2 cu refrigerator/freezer and table

Tiny House Boxout window over the sink

Tiny House Boxout window over the sink with custom mason jar lighting fixture

Tiny House Table

The drop leaf table in the kitchen

Drop leaf table

Justin and his father enjoying a cop of joe

Tiny House Kitchen

Tiny house kitchen view from the great room

Tiny house birch branch rail

Tiny house birch branch rail

tiny house, Minnesota tiny house

Tiny house Hobbit stove

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Tiny House Bathroom

Tiny House Bathroom

 

Tiny House Bathroom

Tiny House Bathroom

Tiny House Smugglers Hold Hatch

Smugglers Hold Hatch

There are 3 hatches with 6 peach crates inside of each hatch, and that provides 18 peach crates under the floor for storage.

Smugglers Hold Storage, Tiny House Minnesota photo shoot, Tiny House Minneapolis, Tiny Green Cabins

Smugglers Hold Storage

Tiny House spice and storage rack

Tiny house sliding spice and storage rack at the head of the stairs

 

 

Good night tiny house

Good night tiny house

The next post will show you how we made the Adirondack recliners and followed up by the step by step of making the mason jar lighting.

 

Freedom Tiny House Series

Ponderosa Tiny House

Features;

  • Custom tiny house trailer
  • Size 8′-6″ x 26′-0″
  • Sleeps 3 – 5
  • Curved Bow for aerodynamics when towing
  • Sunken Living Room
  • Full Sized tub
  • Space for washer dryer
  • Vanity at bath
  • Dual Lofts
  • Dual Stairs with storage
  • Fold up deck
  • Fold down deck canopy
  • Sliding patio door with grids
  • Wood framed (steel optional)
  • LP Smart Siding shingle panels
  • Corrugated Steel siding
  • Steel roof, guaranteed 50 years
Rustic Traveler Tiny House

Ponderosa Tiny House

Rustic Traveler Slice

Ponderso  Slice

Rustic Traveler Slice

Ponderoas Slice

Pricing starts at   $68,019.53

 

 

The Move

Or Growing pains for the shop

A month ago, we were informed that our space that we were sharing with Pete’s Fabrication and Repair was ending as he was terminating his lease with the buildings owners. Our 1st thought was to rent the whole shop out for Tiny Green Cabins, but after running numbers, it was proving to be more than I wanted to undertake at this time. Some of our ideas for using the extra space;

  • Rent out some space for a private party to build their own tiny house
  • Host a series of workshops on building tiny
  • Rent out space for someone needed a shop for a weekend or short project
  • Move to New Ulm, MN for a less expensive shop

In our search of New Ulm we found a place that was for sale and inquired about it. The building was for sale and it could be leased.

After asking questions about utilities, we learned that the heat bill was over a $1000 a month through the winter. That heat cost made the New Ulm space more expensive that what we were looking at in Blaine. We made an offer on the lease asking for the owner to pay for 50% of the propane costs for the 1st winter and we would do a 2 year lease. He declined .

So we decided to stay in the Blaine area for the foreseeable future.

Then we had a visit from another shop owner that did welding and fabrication whom asked if we would be willing to switch spaces. He had 3000 sqft and we had 6000 sqft. The numbers were a wee bit more friendly, and after some thinking and discussion with family, I decided to make the switch. That meant tow shops that were working plus one that was closing needed to switch spaces. For me, that was an easy task as my work had not accumulated a lot of stuff….yet!!

Our part of the move was easy. The fabricator has a lot of specialized equipment and a mezzanine to move. He said he had built the mezzanine so he could take it with him. This we had to see.

And he did it. I am impressed!!!

However, Pete was swamped with trying to finish up his back log of clients and others that heard he was closing and wanted that last minute car repair done by him.

So we loaded our trailer and moved it to the new place and then moved the hOMe out of the shop to its new place.

So, now it was up to sort things out, pack up what he wanted, and toss the rest. He tossed out a lot, and he still has a lot to sort and liquidate. In the meantime, he is using some of our space and will be having a fire sale over the next month..

We are just about finished with the hOMe bound for MA, and have the other custom hOMe started. And that is all we can fit in the shop until Pete moves his stuff out. In a week or so, we will have room to start the Prairie Rose for the workshop class we will be holding the end of October.  And when Pete moves his stuff, we will have room for a 3rd tiny house.

The start to finish of the move took 8 days, with the weekend included in that.  Now we need to organize the shelves and shop so we can find stuff easily.

If anyone wants us to build or start one in the next month or so, I would suggest that you book that slot. Otherwise, the next slot after that would be early spring of 2016.

Tiny House Builder, Jim

Tiny House Builder, Jim

 

Window Installation

We install windows at Tiny Green Cabins using the following steps for all of our tiny houses.

Tools Needed: Hammer, caulk gun, slap stapler, level, tape measure, utility knife, work gloves

Materials needed: Butyl Caulk, Dupont Flex Wrap, Dupont Straight Tape 4″ wide, Shims, Great Stuff Window spray expanding foam

Step 1;  After the Tyvek house wrap has been installed and wrapped into each of the windows opening, cut

Wildflower Tiny House Bunkhouse Model

Wildflower Tiny House Bunkhouse Model

the Tyvek house wrap at the window rough opening top corner diagonally about 4″ upward and away from the window and tack back.

Step 2; Cut the Dupont Flex Wrap 12″ to 16″ longer than the window sill. Peel off the paper backer centering the Flex Wrap in the opening and full width of the sill. Press into place across the bottom and up the sides of the window – minimum up each window side is 6″.

Step 3; Peel the paper off the back of the flex wrap hanging outside the window and starting at each window corner, pull the corners outward and stretch while adhering it to the walls, then pull and press the rest of flex wrap into place.

Step 4; Using the shims, lay a shim at each window sill corner for creating a space to insulate used in step 10

Step 5; Caulk up the sides of the window frame, across the top of the window rough opening and down the other side to the sill. Warning, DO NOT CAULK ACROSS THE BOTTOM OR WINDOW SILL  – EVER

Step 6; Insert the window into the rough opening, center the window on the opening, and nail at one top corner of the window flange. Level the window and after leveling nail the other top window corner.

Step 7; Plumb the window sides   Tip: Square the window and check the reveal spaces where the window meets the window jamb. To square, using a tape measure, check the measurements diagonally from each corner to the opposite corner – they should be equal.  Also check the window edges from other features of the wall, such as wall corners or fascias to make sure things are set correctly. On a tiny house, since other features are close to the window, this is a check that everything is spaced correctly. After this check nail the window in place and around the window perimeter, nailing through every other hole in the flange.

Step 8; Install the corner flaps at each corner of the window.

Step 9; Cut the butyl tape for each side of the window and across the window head. Each piece should be cut 8″ to 12″ longer than the window. Install each side, and then install the top piece of Butyl tape.

Step 10; Do not install Butyl tape across the bottom window flange – EVER. This flange is left without butyl tape and caulk to allow water and moisture to escape in case it ever gets behind the window.  This is why the flex wrap is used as a sill pan flashing.

Step 11; Pull the Tyvek that was tacked out of the way, fold it down, and tack in place, cutting just short of the window head. Tape to the butyl tape and Tyvek together to seal them tight.

Step 12; insulate the window jambs cavity to wall opening. We recommend Great Stuff as the expanding foam seals the cavity better than a stuffed fiberglass can. Plus the foam does not allow mold to grow if the window leaks.

Here a good video that follows our best practices

Tiny Houses are filling a Vacuum

Nature abhors a vacuum

With the great recession of 2008, a void or vacuum appeared in the housing market, and it is not where one would think it is. The McMansions are thriving with larger and more unique designs every day.

These buyers are a move up from the previous level of buyers as well as buyers already in that niche that want something bigger or as a result of having to move. So, if one follows the buyers backwards, one finds a niche that has fallen on hard times in the housing market.

That niche was filled with 1st time buyers as well builders that carved out a niche for themselves with this market share. As these buyers started being locked out of the housing market because they were unable to qualify for started homes, it impacted those builders also.

The mortgage industry, after taking a beating on loans from 1st time buyers, changed the requirements to qualify for a loan. That meant increasing the down payments from 5% to 10- 20% and more. The 1st time buyer using this loan plus their meager savings is considered by many to be the foundation of the housing market. And no one in the housing market gains move up equity until the entry level buyer does. With no one buying in the entry level market, the next level of homes does not gain equity very fast, so they become stuck.

However, the people that own McMansions have deep pockets, so equity is less of a concern and keeping up appearances is more so. I helped build a mansion that was over 25,000 square feet, and one of the owner comments was that he had to build a place that large for entertaining clients as well as business partners.

It had 4 levels, with a nanny’s quarters in the trusses of the house that was 2000 square feet. The great room could hold 6 Tinys easily. The place was huge and it required 2 years to build. It is a beautiful elegant home and one could get lost in it easily. It also kept many people busy during the build, and I am sure the decorating and furnishing budget being about 25% of the build cost would mean that furnishing was at least 3-4 million. That is a lot of tiny houses in comparison.

And the McMansions and its owners keep caretakers, housekeepers, cooks, chauffeurs, and nannies employed, so the McMansions are a benefit to many people in the workforce.

The recovery in housing is becoming “supersized” as these people build bigger driving up the average square feet of housing with square footages growing faster now than during the peak of the housing boom. The average square foot has grown from 2,392 square feet in 2010 to 2,600 square feet last year. This growth is size has resulted in a new word for McMansions, ginormous homes. Homes over 4000 square feet have increased by 12%.

So, where have the people in the starter home market gone? Some have moved in with parents and some parents have moved in with children, a lot of them are renting rather than buying. And some are buying or building tiny houses. Except these tiny houses are on wheels and not classified as housing and do not impact traditional single family square footages.

This supersizing of McMansions is in direct opposition to the tiny house movement of people downsizing to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

And some call it a small or tiny movement and a trend. No one knew how big it is, or if it will grow much, but after last weekend and the Tiny House Jamboree in Colorado Springs, Colorado, people may rethink the size of the movement. The tiny house movement may become more than just a small, tiny movement. Facebook groups that have 150000, 100,000, and 20,000 fans are growing faster than butter melts on a sizzling hot griddle.  The Tiny House Jamboree that was expecting maybe 10,000 visitors had well over 16,000 visitors for the weekend event. That is a lot of people that are more than curious about tiny houses and kicking tires.

Tiny Green Cabins is expanding and evolving along with the movement to better serve our customers; from an average of 1 to 2 homes a year, we are now employing 3+ people and have room for building 3 Tinys at a time in our new shop area.

As the movement grows, companies that build park models are making an entrance into the tiny house market.  They offer basic floor plans with standard features as well as standardized furniture. And when it comes to options, you may want hardwood floors, or a custom exterior you need to go a custom tiny house builder. And that is where Tiny Green Cabins excel. We have over 40 years’ experience in building custom homes, so we enjoy creating a new look for the discerning customer.

So, when you are ready to start your build, give us a call or email us to start the process rolling.

Tiny Green Cabins, Mountain Cabins, Tiny Cabins, Green Cabins, Tiny Green Cabins, Garden Office

 

Tiny House Parking Request

A tiny house special request

Tiny House OM Request

In need of parking place, can be temporary or permanent

One of our customers that retained us to build the attached tiny house for them has requested assistance in locating a place to park their hOMe tiny house. It is 28’ x 8’6”. Their ideal location would be in the vicinity of Framingham, MA. with availability as of August 1, 2015.

If you know of someone that has space for this couple to live in their tiny home such as a RV Park, trailer park, back yard, or field close to Framingham, MA. let us know. This tiny house is able to be lived in off the grid for extended periods of time with a solar system and 200 gallons of water storage tanks.

Send Jim an email at jim@tinygreencabins.com or comment on this thread.

Thank you – Jim

Tiny House Reverse Snobbery

Snob…the character or quality of being a snob.

Reverse Snobbery…a person overly proud of being one of or sympathetic to the common people, and who denigrates or shuns those of superior ability, education, social standing, etc. Dictionary.com
Pretentious…Trying to sound intelligent by using long, complicated words, even though you don’t know what they mean.

stirring the pot

I have noticed over the years some trolls that follow the tiny house movement only to cause mischief and create drama in a thread or post. To stir things up a bit or poke the bear.

Poke the bear by Urban Dictionary is To act in such a way that has a good, but not definite chance, of causing trouble. (You can poke a bear once and maybe get away with it, but if you keep poking him, he’s going to get really angry.) To stir things up.

Internet troll by Wikipedia;

In Internet slang, a troll (/ˈtroʊl/, /ˈtrɒl/) is a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting arguments or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community (such as a newsgroup, forum, chat room, or blog) with the deliberate intent of provoking readers into an emotional response[3] or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion.

This sense of the word troll and its associated verb trolling are associated with Internet discourse, but have been used more widely. Media attention in recent years has equated trolling with online harassment.

As a builder of tiny houses, we have noticed trolls and received emails from them attacking us about being a builder of quality tiny homes for people that choose not to build them, themselves.

A healthy discussion about any subject or topic is good and we welcome them. As long as the comments are constructive in nature and not demeaning to anyone, it can help people see both sides of the argument or discussion. Too often we reject out of hand opinions or facts that go against our beliefs, and that is not healthy.

And we have seen some mean spirited attacks on people that were meant to insult and be inflammatory. Then when challenged and shown the error of their misinformed comment, do a turn about and attack from a different direction. A true tactic of a troll.

When one builds a beautiful one of a kind tiny houses such as these  examples, one is going to get a lot of attention via magazines, webs, and social media.

And that is fine. We like thinking outside the box and bringing some of many talents and skills to the planning and building process of tiny homes. We have also learned that our customers also like being original and creating something different; be it with color choices, or architectural styles. And that bothers some people that think that two of these homes are seen as overly large, expensive, ultra-extravagant, and excessively lavish.

I am proud that I built these tiny homes. The movement to me is about not only downsizing, but living your dreams and gaining the ability to run with the giants; be it traveling, adding charm to your tiny house, or pursuing your passions.

And the person that takes the time to research and build their own tiny home should feel proud of their accomplishment as well. And that does not mean ridiculing someone that chooses to “hire” it done for them. It is like belonging to a click in grade school, so passe! All the people that chose to downsize should be proud of their accomplishment.

Some people choose to invest a year or two of their time in sweat equity of their tiny home and another would rather have that time to do what they love to do. Neither one is wrong and have their reasons for how they built their tiny as well as what materials they chose.

In Peru, they use mud, straw, and whatever material they can salvage for their homes. And much has not changed in the last 1000 years. And we also learned that people often think the same. Just as THOW’s are built here to avoid codes and property taxes by some, the homes in Peru are never quite done; windows missing, 2nd floor expansion underway, an addition in progress. Their reason for never finishing their home is that they are taxed at a much lower rate, if even not at all!